What We Do

Healthcare Program

Health care and health systems in South Sudan are faced with great challenges. More than five million people in South Sudan need humanitarian healthcare services. Most health facilities are not functioning and those that are functioning provide minimal services due to drug and staff shortages. Children under age 5 are particularly vulnerable to disease, including due to the low level of routine immunization and their already weakened state. Women face serious health risks throughout their life cycle. Survivors of gender-based violence have inadequate access to services and women have inadequate access to skilled personnel during pregnancy and childbirth. As the conflict has spread and the economic crisis has deepened, people with HIV/AIDS or TB have become cut-off from life-saving treatment, particularly in the Greater Equatoria and Greater Upper Nile regions. South Sudan faces highly endemic communicable diseases, with persistent outbreaks of cholera, measles, malaria, hepatitis B/E and kala-azar affecting large parts of the country due to poor living conditions, poor sanitation and overcrowding. Malaria, typhoid, diarrhoea and pneumonia are the top reasons of outpatient consultations.

In response to these, CMD will focus on the following goal and strategies during 2018-2022:

Strategic Goal:

Contribute to “reduction of mortality and mobility rate through quality health care services to communities”

 

Strategies:

  1. Preventive & health promotion services: Promote prevention by creating awareness on disease outbreak, disaster preparedness, and preventive measures.
  2. Curative services: Enhance quality healthcare services and create awareness and early diagnosis and treatment
  3. Rehabilitation of existing facilities and establishment of new facilities. Rehabilitate existing facilities, the establishment of more PHCCs and PHCUs and Referral Hospital
  4. Reproductive health programmes: Reduce maternal and neonatal death through Comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care (CEmoNC) Basic emergency obstetric and neonatal care (BMoC) quality services.

Food Security and Livelyhoods

Food security in South Sudan is likely to deteriorate to unprecedented levels, with thousands of people at risk of famine. At the height of the lean season in July 2017, some 4.8 million people – more than one in every three people in South Sudan – were estimated to be severely food insecure. It is projected that more than five million people will be in urgent need of food security and livelihoods support during the lean season in 2018. This includes some 302,800 refugees in South Sudan. People affected by conflict and displaced households are facing alarming food consumption gaps. As the humanitarian crisis has deepened and expanded, food insecurity has risen to unprecedented levels due to a combination of conflict, insecurity, low cereal production, severe economic crisis, and the exhaustion of coping capacities in the last five years of crisis. These multiple and interlocking threats have caused a decline in purchasing power, reduced trade flows, decreasing agricultural production and expanding insecurity, making the food security situation highly precarious. Negative coping strategies have been adopted by most of the population, particularly reducing the number of meals consumed by (89%), reducing adult consumption (74%), relying on wild food (70%) and spending a day without food (58%). 32% Livelihoods have been decimated by the crisis. About 50% of all harvests have been lost in areas affected by violence, and many farmers have been unable to plant or harvest due to insecurity and restrictions on freedom of movement.

In response to these, CMD will focus on the following goal and strategies during 2018-2022:

Strategic Goal:

“Improved food security and livelihoods among communities through crop and horticulture production, livestock production, fishing, self-reliance, and resilience”

 

Strategies:

  1. Crop and horticulture: Enhance crop and horticultural production activities to ensure adequate food production among the target communities.
  2. Livestock Production: Reduce livestock morbidity and mortality rates among the livestock.
  3. Fishing: Enhance fishing activities and value addition methods for maximum output.
  4. Livelihoods and empowerment programmes: Enhance livelihoods and copying skills and literacy among the communities targeted and sustainable agricultural development.

Nutrition Program

Overview:

South Sudan faces a chronic nutrition crisis driven by many inter-related factors, including: rising food insecurity; high morbidity rates; limited access to safe water and sanitation; and declining availability of health services. More than one million children under age 5 and over 339,000 pregnant and lactating women are estimated to be acutely malnourished and in need of life-saving nutrition services. Affected People Acute malnutrition most affects children under age 5 and women, as well as other vulnerable groups including the elderly and HIV/AIDS and TB patients. Conflict, threats and attacks against aid workers, and economic decline have severely impacted the provision of life-saving nutrition services. Children suffering from severe acute malnutrition are nine times more likely to die than their healthy peers, while those with moderate acute malnutrition are three times more likely to die. Undernourished children who survive may become locked in a cycle of recurring illness and faltering growth, with irreversible damage to their development and cognitive abilities.

In response to these, CMD will focus on the following goals and strategies during 2018-2022:

Strategic Goal:

Contribute to “reduction of malnutrition rate among children under 5 years and PLWAs through targeted supplementary feeding program, blanket supplementary feeding program and stabilization centers”

 

Strategies:

  1. Infant young children feeding programme: Promote exclusive breastfeeding from 0-6 month’s programmes through awareness creation by staff and community volunteers.
  2. Targeted supplementary feeding programme: Increase screening and provision of service to the moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) for children from 6-59 months at CMD Clinics, Primary Health Care Centers – PHCCs and Primary Health Care Units (PHCUs).
  3. Blanket supplementary feeding programmes: Increase screening and provision of feeds to PLW’s through feeding programme in CMD Primary Health Care Centers – PHCCs, Primary Health Care Units (PHCUs).
  4. Out-patient therapeutical programme: Increase screening and provision of services to the young children from 6-59 months with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) without medical complication at the outpatient level at CMD clinics, Primary Health Care Centers – PHCCs and Primary Health Care Units – PHCUs
  5. In-patient management of malnourished children/ stabilization centers: Support admission and provision of services to severe Acute Malnutrition with medical complication from 0-59 months at CMD Clinics, Primary Health Care Centers – PHCCs, Primary Health Care Units – PHCUs and other referrals.

Education & Child Protection

Overview:

Since conflict erupted in December 2013, some 1.17 million children aged 3 to 17 years have lost access to education. The Primary Net Enrolment rate is now 43.5% due to conflict, displacements, and lack of trained teachers, inadequate supplies, and disruption of education services fueled by the economic crisis. In addition, some 124,100-refugee children in South Sudan will need education assistance in 2018 onward. Affected People of South Sudanese school-aged children (3 to 17 years old) have been endangered and had their education disrupted by conflict and displacement. Adolescent boys and young men are particularly vulnerable to recruitment by armed actors. At the same time, adolescent girls are at increasing at risk of early and forced marriages, as well as sexual abuse and exploitation, due to the escalating economic crisis. Some 1.17 million children have lost access to education due to the crisis in South Sudan. School-aged children represent more than 47.75% of the displaced population. Education infrastructure has also been dramatically impacted by violence. This interruption of education will have immediate, medium and long-term consequences for the stability and development of South Sudan, as children who are not in school will lack the structure and stimulation for healthy cognitive and psychosocial development. Furthermore, the education crisis increases the risk that more out-of-school adolescents will be recruited by armed actors. Children, parents and the communities consider education a critical priority.

In response to these, CMD will focus on the following goal and strategies during 2018-2022:

Strategic Goal:

“To promote inclusive access, retention and transition of children in school in the next five years”

 

Strategies:

  1. Access to education: Improve inclusive access to education through teacher recruitment, construction and rehabilitation of schools and equipping of schools.
  2. Education governance and leadership: Improve governance and established ownership of schools by communities.
  3. Retention programmes in schools: Reduce school dropout and out of school children in the communities
  4. Girl child education: Increase girl’s entry and participation in schools and school programmes
  5. Out of school youth programmes: Support out of school skills training and livelihood programmes

Water Sanitation and Hygine

Overview:

Nearly 4.8 million of the most vulnerable South Sudanese need support to access safe water and basic sanitation facilities. It is estimated that only 41% of the population have access to safe water. As the conflict spread to new areas in 2016, boreholes were damaged or made dysfunctional due to lack of repairs. For the third year in a row, a cholera epidemic was declared in 2016/2017. Access to safe water in urban areas has diminished because of rapidly rising prices due to inflation. Some 302,800 refugees will also need WASH services in the northern parts of the country. There are also people in urban areas who are vulnerable to outbreaks due to lack of access to safe water, including due to rising prices. Flood plain areas along the River Nile and Sobat River remain at high risk of waterborne and water-related diseases. Lack of access to safe water and sanitation pose specific protection risks for women. The conflict in South Sudan has compounded the WASH needs of an already vulnerable population. It is estimated that only 7% of the population have access to improved sanitation, while 74% of the population practices open defecation (50% in urban areas and 79% in rural areas). The main drivers of vulnerabilities related to WASH are closely linked to the conflict. In conflict-affected areas existing WASH services outside PoCs sites are inadequate to address the needs of IDPs and host communities and have been further overstretched by new arrivals. WASH infrastructure has been deliberately targeted by armed actors during the conflict.

In response to these, CMD will focus on the following goal and strategies during 2018-2022

Strategic Goal:

“Improved health and socio-economic well-being of communities by reducing the incidence of water and sanitation-related diseases through sustainable safe water, sanitation and hygienic practices”.

 

Strategies:

  1. Provision of Clean water:  Improve access to clean and safe water to the communities
  2. Sanitation: Improve access to safe sanitation to the communities
  3. Hygiene promotion: Reduce risk of WASH related sickness in the community due to behaviour change.
  4. Environmental stewardship and climate change mitigation: Reduce impact of environmental degradation to the targeted areas

Protection & Peace Building

Overview:

South Sudan is primarily a protection crisis. Since 2013, the population has been exposed to repeated deliberate attacks on civilians and other violations of international humanitarian and human rights law, including forced recruitment of children and deliberate destruction of civilian infrastructures. Government soldiers, armed opposition groups and criminals all act with complete disregard for the rule of law. Affected People All segments of the population are exposed to protection risks. Women and girls have been disproportionately affected by gender-based violence, with uniformed soldiers often reported to be the perpetrators. Men and boys face high risks of forced recruitment, as well as the threat of being detained or killed if they are perceived to be of fighting age. Elderly and disabled persons are often unable to flee in advance of fighting and face increased challenges in accessing services. Without a safe environment, children are particularly vulnerable to abuse, neglect, recruitment and psychological trauma. The eruption of fighting in Juba in July 2016 highlighted the fragility of the protection environment in South Sudan. The outbreak of violence plunged civilians back into a state of uncertainty, and further compounded their already desperate protection needs. Both parties to the conflict have been accused of violations of international humanitarian law and grave human rights violations, including killing, abduction, rape and restrictions on freedom of movement.

In response to these, CMD in the next five years will focus on the following goal and strategies during 2018-2022:

Strategic Goal:

“Promote protection and peacebuilding programmes in the communities”

 

Strategies:

  1. Family Tracing and Reunification: Engage in family tracing and reunification to address the problems of separations.
  2. Psychosocial support to children: Reduce trauma and other psychological effects through psychosocial support programme.
  3. Child protection networking: Improve the community system on child tracing and re-unification
  4. Child rights advocacy: Advocate for the rights and protection of children.
  5. Gender-Based Violence: Advocate against GBV through awareness creation, capacity building and advocacy
  6. Peace-building:  Support peace-building programmes within the communities and dialogue between the communities
  7. Conflict transformation and Reconciliation: Support conflict transformation and reconciliation programmes in the communities.

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E-mail: info@cmdafrica.org  |  cmdsouthsudan@gmail.com
Phone: +211 950 888 555 | +211 922 211 444   
                +211 927 262 266  |  Kenya: +254 715 888 555

CMD is a registered non-profit, non-governmental, humanitarian relief and development organization (South Sudan’s Charity Registration No. 216).